Appendix 1 - Technology Definitions

In all cases, when stats are being cited for any technology or facility, these stats are defined as follows - beam rating, shield rating, torpedo/missile rating, hull rating.

 

Example:Training Camps (TC) cost 120 RPs and have stats of 0,0,0,24. This means that a TC has a beam rating of 0-pts, a shield rating of 0-pts, a torpedo/missile rating of 0-pts, and a hull size of 24-pts.

 

Techs in Appendix 1 are generally available as baseline capabilities.

 

Aerospace fighters: These are aircraft used for atmospheric combat. They are transported in bays like those of space fighters and built according to the same rules, with a cost multiplier of 50% instead of 75% due to their inability to engage in space combat.

 

Agricultural stations: Agricultural Stations increase the base SRP output of a world that produces the SRP Food/Agricultural Products by 10%. Agricultural Stations cost 400 RPs. Agricultural Stations can only be constructed on previously colonized worlds.

 

Aircraft factories: Aerospace forces are built in aerospace factories, with a flat cost of 40 RPs. An aerospace/aircraft factory produces 200 Hl of aircraft per turn as a 2nd generation baseline; this may be increased through R&D.

 

Armor: Armor is an ablative substance plated to the hull of a starship for the purpose of absorbing damage. In some cases, armor is also part of the internal reinforcing of a starship hull. Armor is a size-0 system which functions exactly like shields, but has its point value added to the ship's hull rather than to its Sh rating, costs 1.67 RPs per point, and can be improved in a similar manner (i.e. armor technology can increase to the point where a single point of armor provides, 2, 3, or 4 pts of protection, etc.). Armor of this type is "ablative" in nature. Resistant armor is discussed elsewhere and is not available as a starting technology under normal circumstances. At the start of the standard game, a ship may only have up to 50% of its hull size added on as armor (e.g., a Hl 15 ship could have no more than 7.5 (8) pts of armor added to it, bringing its Hl rating up to 23 pts for combat purposes). Armor does not add to a ship's hull size in terms of constructing that particular hull (e.g., a Hl 15 ship with 8 pts of armor would still be constructed as a Hl 15 ship, not a Hl 23 ship).

 

Barracks: A troop barracks is a size-1 system costing 3.33 RPs which is designed to house, transport, and care for the personnel of a ground unit force and/or boarding parties. A barracks suffices for the transport of 1500 combat-ready ground unit personnel. Thus, 3 barracks spaces are required per hull point of non-mechanized unit (at 4500 personnel per hull point), while those 3 barracks could transport the personnel for 5 Hl points of mechanized unit(s). Gunboat tenders require one barracks space to provide the gunboat crews temporary quarters more extensive than those aboard their gunboats.

 

Bases: Bases are massive, immobile facilities. They are described in detail in rules section 6.5.0.

 

Basic university: This is a facility used to train graded scientists. It costs 40 RPís and can train 20 graded scientists a turn.

 

Battlewagons: Ships with a base hull size of 17 or more may be built as battlewagons. These are large, powerful, but relatively slow vessels. A battlewagon has a maximum speed fixed no higher than its cruising speed. In return, it receives an extra .25 equipment spaces per hull point. This is a baseline technical capacity available to anyone capable of building FTL ships of Hl 17 or higher.

 

Beam Weapons: All beam weapons are rated according to the number of points of damage that each beam emitter/projector is capable of putting out (i.e., 1, 2, 3 pts of damage per emitter per shot, etc.). Most emitters are size-1 systems and are paid for "by rating" (i.e., a ship equipped with 10x3-pt beam emitters would have a beam rating of 10x3= 30 pts which would cost30/3=10x10=100 RPs) plus the addition of any "special effects".

 

Boarding Parties: The boarding party is a special weapon that a ship can use instead of its normal attack. All raids are considered hit and run unless the ship is actually captured. Boarding party actions are always conducted prior to any other fire during the turn so the troops have a chance to capture things before they get blown up. Ammunition limits are not a factor in boarding party combat. BP is a much more intense squad level combat than ground actions.

 

The Attack Rating (AR) of a ship has more to do with what type of troopers and how many can be shoved out the airlock, sent via assault sleds, or delivered by transcaster. Boarding actions can result in failure, draws, random critical hits, or a successful capture. Attack strength is determined by number, type of units, and delivery method. The AR rating equals the total AR of all units available to serve as boarding parties; for each unit, this is determined by their total beam and torpedo ratings of the boarding parties deployed multiplied by the modifier for means of boarding the target. AR can be split among different boarding parties, down to the level of a single BP per attack.

 

Defensive strength is a factor of hull size plus any defensively assigned boarding parties that it has on board. The DR assigned to a ship on the ship data line is equal to twice the AR of defending BPís aboard; the BE adds the unitís hull value for DR computations. A successfully captured ship is taken out of the fight as if itís destroyed. On a successful raid (rolling 25% or less), the ship is captured. Otherwise, a random critical hit is scored. Captured ships are rendered dead in space as their normal space drives power down. Monsters or biotech ships can be captured; they are literally knocked unconscious for the duration of the battle.

 

Boarding parties are built as if they were hull 1 non-mechanized or powered armor units. They differ in two respects. First, the personnel requirement for a boarding party is 30-50 individuals, rather than 900-4500. As such, their training camp or transport requirements are usually too trivial to be considered. Second, they have no role as standard ground units in garrisons or invasions. Their beam and torpedo ratings are used solely for boarding actions.

 

The Attack Rating of a boarding party has a base value equal to the BPís total beam and torpedo rating, and is modified by delivery means as shown below:

 

EVA (Extra Vehicular Assault)                               AR x 1

Breaching pod                                                         AR x 1.5

Ramships/Assault Shuttles                                     AR x 2

Transcaster Assault                                                AR x 3

 

Boarding parties may also be assigned to defense. In this case, they contribute twice their AR to DR instead.

 

Boarding parties may be raised as untrained, but cannot be used before reaching Average grade. Non-mechanized boarding parties must purchase EVA capability to launch EVA attacks. Boarding parties can be used in ground combat, though planetary combat usually includes fewer likely targets for boarding action. BP attacks in planetary combat are identical in treatment to those in space, with the unlikely-target caveat above and with drop capability taking the place of EVA capability for unassisted BP attacks.

 

Boarding Parties as such are available without research. However, assault shuttles/ramships and transcasters require research before they can be used as delivery systems, and EVA-based and breaching pod BP attacks are usable only by a limited variety of unit types and can have disappointing odds of success. Assault shuttle and transcaster capability have RP and space requirements.

 

Breaching pods: This system is also known as boarding pods. They are simple, not especially maneuverable, nearly unarmed, short-ranged spacecraft used to deliver boarding parties a relatively short distance from a launching unit onto a target. The armament of the pod is limited to that carried by the troops aboard and directional explosive packs used to blow open the targetís hull at the point where the pod is secured by grapple systems to it. A breaching pod is built as a fighter-scale unit. It has no XO capability, no spacecraft-scale weaponry, no defenses, and only barracks spaces inside. One barracks space is sufficient for one boarding party. A typical breaching pod design will be hull 1 with one barracks space and a cost of 5 RPís. Any ground unit capable of boarding party action is capable of launching them by breaching pod; this is the chief advantage of using breaching pods at all rather than solely EVA attacks. (In TCOM1, they also enjoy a slight range advantage over EVA attacks.)

 

Bridges: This is a baseline technology, available without research to anyone able to build ships at all. Starships can be assumed to have bridges without including this system; what this system represents is simply a bridge that lets certain personnel use their skills to their maximum. A bridge costs 3.33 RPís base and occupies one equipment space. The bonuses provided by graded officers assigned to the ship, not including the commander or any providing any fleet-wide or similar bonus, are doubled. Note specifically that the bonuses provided to officers by flag bridges and CICís in particular are offered only to officers who are not eligible for bonuses from bridges. A CIC helps out the commander, who canít benefit from a bridge; and a flag bridge helps out the admiral and other officers providing fleet-wide or similar bonuses, who also therefore cannot benefit from a bridge. This is not cumulative with any bonus from an advanced damage control center or advanced engineering station. It deserves mention that, while a bridge is a baseline capability, it is only useful in combination with some non-baseline graded officer types.

 

Bureaus: A Bureau is a governmental organization for routine performance of Specified operations of a particular sort: Counter-intelligence/conversion; Military; Political; Economic; Diplomatic; Research; or Cryptographic. Each turn, the Bureau produces Operations Points (OPís) equal to the number of RPís invested in it to date for Specified operations of its type. A Bureau is established with a minimum of 50 RPís. Additional details on the use and function of Bureaus are in rules section 16.0.0.

 

Cargo Bays: Each cargo bay is a size-1 "box" designed to hold cargo of various types. Each starship cargo bay can carry one of the following:

 

20 RP's of colonization project, repair parts, etc. (Colonization RPís may be carried only by freighter.)

20 RPís of foreign aid

8 Hl in uncrated (i.e., suitable for immediate transfer to a hangar for near-future operation) fighters of fighter equivalents

12 Hl in crated fighters or fighter equivalent units (e.g. mines)

3 Hl in crated gunboats

.5 Hl in starship component

.25 Hl in base component

160 standard size missiles or comparable munitions

80 heavy missiles or comparable munitions

160 spaces of required launcher of capital missiles (e.g., if they're capital missiles for 4 space launchers, it can carry 40 of them) or comparable munitions

1 starship-turn of supplies

4 gunboat-turns of supplies (2 for 1st gen gunboats)

8 fighter-turns of supplies (4 for 1st gen fighters)

equipment for up to 10 Hl points of mechanized ground unit(s)

1500 personnel of trained ground units, not combat ready

 

Cargo bays onboard gunboats are capable of handling exactly 50% of what starship cargo bays can carry. Cargo bays on fighters are capable of handling 12.5% of a starship's capacity. XO rack cargo pods cannot be ganged together to carry larger cargoes, and unit components cannot be broken down into sizes less than 1 Hl. Cargo bays are one of a very few "free" systems in the game (i.e., while they occupy 1 equipment space, they are free and have a cost of 0 RPs). Cargo bays typically require four days for each loading or unloading operation.

 

Civil service academy: This facility is used for the training of graded administrators. It costs 40 RPís and can put out 20 graded administrators each turn.

 

Collier magazines: Collier magazines are magazines designed for the carriage and dispensing of ammunition to other ships, as opposed to firing them from the ship itself. A collier magazine occupies one equipment space, costs 3.33 RPís, and carries ammunition at cargo bay rates. A unit may count its collier magazines as if they were cargo bays to determine eligibility for slow freighter discounts or other freighter status. The advantages to moving ammunition in collier magazines are the following. First, a ship receives no VOLATILE or CARGO tag for ammunition in collier magazines as opposed to cargo bays. Second, time to load and unload ammunition from collier magazines to other unitsí inherent or standard magazines is virtually negligible, as opposed to the normal four days per loading operation for cargo. Collier magazines may not be used as standard magazines by the unit with them, but the unit can reload any inherent or standard magazines immediately after a battle from any collier magazines it might have. Collier magazines are a baseline technical capability for any state with ammunition-based weapons.

 

Command Information Centers (CICs)/flag bridges: Combat Information Centers (CICís) and flag bridges are specialized systems for ship and fleet command respectively. CICís occupy 2 equipment spaces and cost 5 points (16.67 RPís base). In addition to use for graded officers, a CIC provides the unit a 5 point target and DEFENSE bonus. Flag bridges occupy one space and cost 1 point (3.33 RPís base), and offer no bonus beyond graded officer support.

 

Communications centers: Communications centers are devices that allow for an extension of communication ranges and, when coupled with a VLRS, supply range. The basic communications center costs 20 points (66.7 RPís), requires 10 equipment spaces aboard a ship or base, can only be used while the unit is not in motion, and requires 1 week to deploy and 1 week to pack back up for travel. Tech advances from there can,

 

a)        reduce the cost to 10 points (1st advance) and then to 1 (2nd advance)

b)       reduce deployment/repacking times to 4 days (1st advance) and then to capable of working while underway without any deployment/repacking at all (2nd advance)

c)        reduce equipment space requirements by 3 equipment spaces per advance, to 7, 4, and 1, the minimum.

 

The rules governing communications can be found in section 13.

 

Construction/Build rate: This is rated in hull points per turn, and governs the speed at which an empireís shipyards and repair yards function. A build rate of 6 hull per turn, for example, will mean that a Hl 6 ship will require one turn to build, a Hl 12 ship will require two, as would a Hl 7 ship. Additional details may be found in the rules sections governing the construction of various unit types.

 

Core Taps: Core Taps increase the base RP output of a world by 10% reflecting expensive and massive, deep-crust mining methods that increase the amount of ore recovered during a turn. Core Taps cost 400 RPs each. Core Taps can only be constructed on previously colonized worlds. Core Taps may not be used to enhance the output of the SRPís Oil/Plastics, Power Focusing/Generation Crystals, Food/Agricultural Products, Drugs/Medicinals, Fuel/Energy Sources, or Antimatter.

 

Cryptographic Units: A specialized Intelligence unit which costs 500 RPs (and 4 PopPs in FOTS: AGA, which introduces the concept of Population and Population Points (PopPs) which are only abstractly represented in FOTS), but which supplies an additional 250 RPs worth per turn towards Intelligence Operations designed to intercept an enemyís Diplomatic or Military communications (i.e., the enemyís internal communications). Cryptographic units may be ordered to intercept one or the other type of message, but not both during the same turn. Alternatively, a Cryptographic Unit may on any turn provide 400 OPís to Cryptographic Specified operations.

 

Early Warning Stations: An early warning station is a form of extremely specialized colony. It costs a flat 80 RPís, produces no income, and may be set up on any body that could support a colony of that species. An early warning station may be set up by any unit with the cargo bay space it requires; freighters are specifically not required, if non-freighters have the requisite 80 RPís of cargo capacity. An early warning station may be picked back up off a planet as quickly as it is put down and relocated without any additional RP expenditure. It can carry on all its functions immediately, within the turn on which it is founded. An early warning station provides the same link in the militaryís communication, scanning, and supply network a standard colony does. It can also provide this for establishing trade routes and the extent of the civilian infrastructure if it is not operating under stealth protocols. Its ability to operate under stealth protocols is one of the chief military benefits of an early warning station. An early warning station working under stealth protocols does not use active sensors but still enjoys the sort of discriminatory sensor capability of active sensors, and it cannot be detected normally from outside the system it occupies.

 

Energy Torpedo Launchers: ETL's are offensive weapon systems which generate "packets" of energy which are then launched in a direct fire mode at a target. Each ETL is paid for "by rating" of the total firepower of the system (e.g., a ship equipped with 10x3-pt ETL's would have a Tp rating of 30 pts which would have a cost of 30/3=10x10=100 RPs). ETL's have neither ammunition limitations nor magazine requirements.

 

External Ordnance Racks: XO racks are specialized "hard points" attached/built into spacecraft hull that allow it to carry certain types of ordnance outside of its hull. Units may mount XO racks at a cost of one point (3.33 RPís base) per 2 racks, up to the base hull value in XO racks. Fighters, unlike gunboats, ships, or bases, purchase XO racks at half cost and may mount up to 8 times their base hull value in XO racks. Many fighters will be designed around this capacity. An XO rack is capable of carrying a cargo pod or one missile into combat at no additional charge. (Of course, you still have to pay for the cargo or the missile itself.) Some other items, such as long-range sensors, may also occupy an XO rack, with one equipment space items taking one XO rack each. These items require purchase as if they were standard, internally-mounted systems. XO racks are a size-0 item. XO racks are available as a baseline capability only for fighters and gunboats.

 

Fieldworks: Fieldworks are relatively light fortifications for use by ground troops defending a planet. They provide the ground unit additional Hl points as armor. Every 3 Hl points of fieldworks costs 5 RPís. There is no limit but expense and practicality on the amount of Hl points from fieldworks a unit may receive. Any unit benefiting from fieldworks receives a NOMOVE tag, as they are not suitably mobile for an effective retreat from combat. Fieldworks are a baseline technology.

 

Fighters: Fighters are the smallest class of regular space vehicle in FOTS. They are normally slower-than-light (STL), and rarely operate far in space or cruising time from their carriers. Fighters are described in detail in rules section 6.4.0.

 

Fighter factories: These facilities are used to produce fighters. A fighter factory costs 40 RPís and can build 200 Hl of fighter per turn (at the 2nd generation factory build rate).

 

Fighter hangars: Each fighter hangar bay is a size-1 system designed to house, launch, and recover fighter craft. Each 2nd gen starship fighter hangar bay is capable of handling up to 8 fighter Hl points at one time (the rest of the space being taken up by fighter launch/recovery/maintenance systems). A hangar bay onboard a gunboat could can handle 50% of this amount. Fighters may not mount hangar bays of any kind. Hangar bays cost 3.33 RPs each.

 

Flagships: A flagship is a specifically-designated ship within a fleet containing that fleetís commanding officer and much of the fleetís command and control facilities. Once battle is joined, the destruction of a flagship and the loss of these facilities have little effect since communications during battle tends to break down anyway. Flagships are mainly a method of designating which ship an empireís ďpersonalitiesĒ are aboard for combat purposes. In FOTS: AGA, a flagship also contributes a certain amount of ďglobalĒ ComP to units under its command. Cost: In standard FOTS, none (aside from the addition of a flag bridge and/or CIC); In FOTS: AGA, +15% of shipís base cost.

 

Fortifications: Fortifications are bases built on a planetary surface specifically to support ground units operating inside of them. The fortification is built as any other base, but it pays a 15% unit surcharge. The fortification is another unit in planetary invasion combat, with all its normal beam, shield, torpedo, hull, and other ratings, and a BUILDING tag. Unlike any other base that happens to be on the ground, fortificationsí barracks are built to allow combat function from within the fortification for the ground troops stationed within them. The ground unitsí weapon ratings are added to those of the fortification (if any); the units can fire normally from within the fortification. (The ground troops are not including in the defense fleet data file independently.) Weapon rating points due to natural weaponry or other melee do not carry over, as the troopers are hardly in a position to charge in and mix it up. Fortifications are a baseline technology.

 

Freighters: Freighter technology makes available a fundamental variety of starship. A freighter is a unit built specifically for transport of cargo. As such, it must be built with a large quantity of cargo holds, 50% or more of its equipment spaces. The following features distinguish a freighter from a warship that happens to have a lot of cargo holds is. First, the freighter may not be refitted to have fewer than 50% of its equipment spaces in cargo holds, while that cargo-heavy warship can lose them in a refit. Second, the freighter is eligible for a 25% cost break if it is built with engines capable of no speed higher than cruise. Freighters that take this option are known as slow freighters; freighters built without it are fast freighters. However, it should be remembered that the cruising speed of fast and slow freighters is no lower than that of the other or of standard warships; the difference is in the maximum speeds only. Third, the basic design of a freighter, quite apart from how its equipment spaces are filled, is considerably different. The provisions for passengers (or similar cargo such as farm animals) are far more ample on a freighter. As a result, a freighter may be used for colonization. While the cargo bays carry the RPís of a colonization effort, the passenger facilities not otherwise represented in equipment spaces carry the passengers not otherwise represented as a game-mechanical component of the colonization effort. Gunboats may be built as freighters, but no gunboat freighter will have the passenger capacity for a colonization effort. You simply get a gunboat eligible for a cost break if its maximum speed is limited, and one with a massive cargo hold commitment.

 

Freighters are a baseline capability for any star-faring nation.

 
Graded administrators: These are individuals (or, for some species/cultures, teams, cabals, families, or more abstract social entities) who are particularly able leaders of sub-national governments and/or bureaucracies. They are civilian (or semi-civilian) equivalents of graded officers and provide the districts under their administration benefits somewhat analogous to those graded officers provide their ships, fleets, divisions, or armies. Graded administrators are assigned a seniority level, and the cost of the graded administrator depends on it. This determines the scope of colonies over which they may provide a production bonus. Players are strongly encouraged to come up with ďrankĒ titles for their administrators for game color purposes.

 

Graded administrators:

Rank:                              Span of administration    RP cost:

Administrator Grade 1    1 colony                        16 RP's

Administrator Grade 2    1 inhabited star system 32 RP's

Administrator Grade 3    2-10 inhabited star systems

                                                                              64 RP's

Administrator Grade 4    11 or more inhabited star systems of a single nation                                                              128 RPís

 

Admin-4's are not baseline technology, and any admin-4 must be an admin-3 trained up to that grade.

 

Administrators have a 1d10 skill roll, and add that percentage to the base RP production under their administration. Administration bonus income is capped at 20% baseline; this cap may be increased with research. Administrators may be trained up to a higher grade with the skill roll retained with 1 turn training, 1 turn spent in current rank working, and the cost of the new grade. The training turn is waived in case of successful participation in a non-routine event, e.g., encouraging a successful bit of military initiative in case of enemy incursion, assimilation of an administered colony with an occupied population, etc. Skill roll may be improved with a turn spent training and the base cost paid again; another skill roll is made and the new skill roll is used if and only if it is better than the previous skill roll.

 

In addition, any graded administrator can give commands to forces in orbit over a colony under his or her administration independent of imperial command. We make the optimistic assumption that theyíre either basically militarily competent to take this sort of initiative, or, more likely, just able to encourage and to order the nameless officers around to do whatever they think is best but havenít got the gumption to do on their own. There is nothing equivalent to a flag bridge or CIC for a graded administrator; their work environments are just their colonies or some site in their systems.

 

Graded administrators may run covert operations Bureaus and Spy Networks exactly as a graded spymaster of equivalent skill level and grade.

 

Graded administrators are a baseline technological capability, immediately available without the need for research, for any culture with almost any history at all of interstellar colonies. This includes at least most any FOTS player race of 1st or 2nd gen starting tech, and probably several 0 gen states.

 
Graded scientists: These are individuals (or, for some species/cultures, teams, cabals, families, or more abstract social entities) who are particularly able leaders of research projects. They are civilian (or semi-civilian) equivalents of graded officers and provide the projects under their supervision benefits somewhat analogous to those graded officers provide their ships, fleets, divisions, or armies. Graded scientists are assigned a seniority level, and the cost of the graded scientist depends on it. This determines the scope of projects over which they may provide a R&D bonus. Players are strongly encouraged to come up with ďrankĒ titles for their scientists for game color purposes.

 

Rank:                   Span of administration    RP cost:

Scientist Grade 1 1 R&D project                16 RP's

Scientist Grade 2 2-4 related R&D projects

                                                                    32 RP's

Scientist Grade 3 5-16 R&D projects, related or not

                                                                    128 RP's

Scientist Grade 4 17 or more R&D projects, related or not

                                                                    500 RP's

 

Scientist-4's are not baseline technology, and any scientist-4 must be an scientist-3 trained up to that grade.

 

Scientists have a 1d10 skill roll, and add that percentage to the effective funding of the project(s) to which the scientist is assigned. Scientist R&D bonus is capped at 20% baseline; this cap may be increased with research. Scientists may be trained up to a higher grade with the skill roll retained with 1 new successful project, 1 turn spent in current rank working, and the cost of the new grade. The time in new grade requirement may be waived in case of a miraculous R&D success; in that case, a scientist-1 might be bumped right up to scientist-3 with the expenditure of 128 RP's. Skill roll may be improved with a turn spent training and the base cost paid again; another skill roll is made and the new skill roll is used if and only if it is better than the previous skill roll.

 

Graded scientists are a baseline technological capability, immediately available without the need for research, for any culture at or above Industrial Age in technology.

 

Graded spymasters: These are individuals (or, for some species/cultures, teams, cabals, families, or more abstract social entities) who are particularly able leaders of espionage, intelligence, and/or counter-intelligence projects. They are the covert ops equivalents of graded officers and provide the projects under their leadership benefits somewhat analogous to those graded officers provide their ships, fleets, battalions, or armies. Graded spymasters are assigned a seniority (sneakiness?) level, and the cost of the graded spymaster depends on it. This determines the scope of operations over which they may provide a bonus. Players are strongly encouraged to come up with ďrankĒ titles for their spymasters for game color purposes.

 

Rank:                                      Span of administration:                   RP cost:

Spymaster Grade 1                 1 covert operation                          16 RP's

Spymaster Grade 2                 2-4 operations of the same type or target 

                                                                                                       32 RP's

Spymaster Grade 3                 5-16 operations, related or not 

                                                                                                     128 RP's

Spymaster Grade 4                 17 or more operations, related or not

                                                                                                     500 RP's

 

Spymaster-4's are not baseline technology, and any spymaster-4 must be an spymaster-3 trained up to that grade.

 

Graded spymasters have a 1d10 skill roll, and add that percentage to the effective funding of the operations to which the spymaster is assigned. Spymaster operation bonus is capped at 20% baseline; this cap may be increased with research. Spymasters may be trained up to a higher grade with the skill roll retained with 1 new successful operation, 1 turn spent in current rank working, and the cost of the new grade. The time in new grade requirement may be waived in case of an especially dramatic operation success; in that case, a spymaster-1 might be bumped right up to spymaster-3 with the expenditure of 128 RP's. Skill roll may be improved with a turn spent training and the base cost paid again; another skill roll is made and the new skill roll is used if and only if it is better than the previous skill roll.

 

Graded spymasters may also be assigned to run one or more Bureaus or Spy Networks. Each Bureau or Spy Network counts as one operation in determining how many or which Networks or Bureaus a given spymaster may oversee. For purposes of being a related ďoperationĒ, Bureaus are related to Bureaus and Networks are related to Networks. For example, a Spymaster Grade 2 could run 4 Bureaus or 4 Networks, but not 2 Bureaus and 2 Networks. A graded spymaster running a Bureau or Spy Network increases the OPís per turn the Bureau or Network generates by a percentage equal to skill roll.

 

Ground attack bomb bays: Ground attack bomb bays are a baseline capability. Ground attack bomb bays are internal fighter or gunboat systems. A fighter ground attack bomb bay carries four bombs; a gunboat ground attack bomb bay carries ten bombs. Ground attack bombs are built, paid for, and treated in ground combat as one point missiles. However, any ground attack bomb bay may unload bombs at any fire rate, and it can be used exclusively for ground combat. Bombing attacks are possible only in the third or later stage of an invasion, and only when no enemy aircraft, fighters, or gunboats are operating.

 

Ground forces: These are units used to take and hold colonies or other ground assets, and occasionally for boarding party combat. Ground forces may be mechanized units, with some 900 personnel and 80-100 vehicles per hull point, or non-mechanized, with approximately 4500 infantry per hull point comprising the unit. Ground forces are described in detail in rules section 6.6.0; ground combat is described in rules section 9.2.0.

 

Ground force academies: These are facilities used for the training of graded officers for ground combat duty. Each academy costs 40 RP's and can graduate up to 20 officers per turn.

 

Gunboats: Gunboats are a form of spacecraft intermediary between the smaller fighter and the larger starship. FTL gunboats (available as a baseline capability at 2nd gen tech levels but not at 1st gen) enjoy a cruising speed advantage over starships. Any gunboat is tied to tending facilities. Gunboats are described in detail in rules section 6.3.0; gunboat movement details and tending requirements can be found in section 4.2.0.

 

Gunboat hangars: Each gunboat hangar bay is a size-1 system designed to house, launch, and recover gunboats. Each 2nd gen starship gunboat hangar bay is capable of handling up to 8 gunboat Hl points at one time (the rest of the space being taken up by gunboat launch/recovery/maintenance systems). Naturally, gunboat hangar bays may not be mounted on fighters or gunboats. Hangar bays cost 3.33 RPs each.

 

Heavy industry: Heavy Industry facilities are required before a planet can begin producing any actual physical constructions such as bases, shipyards, starships, etc. Heavy Industry consists of factories, machine shops, power plants, and the personnel to operate these facilities. Heavy Industry supplies the steel, plastics, computer chips, cable, and all the actual physical materials needed to build things. Playersí homeworlds are assumed to have heavy industry complexes to start. Heavy Industry costs 400 RPs to place on any world.

 

Improved/diminished base signature masking: This is a baseline capability for any space-faring state, but it can be increased with additional research. FOTS bases, being immobile, derive no defense from mobility; in fact, they suffer a base DEFENSE penalty of -30. Bases may be built with improved signature masking, for a price. For a 5% surcharge per level, bases may lose 10 points of DEFENSE penalty, up to no penalty for a 15% surcharge. After that, the masking effect may be increased for +5 DEFENSE per 5% unit surcharge paid, up to 3 levels, but research may increase the allowed levels by one per Development success.

 

Improved/decreased tactical mobility: This is a baseline capability for any space-faring state, but it can be increased with additional research. A tactically mobile unit Ė i.e., typically, one without a NO MOVE tag Ė may be built with increased mobility. In FOTS each such level provides the unit one additional point of thrust or speed and a 5 point DEFENSE bonus. Each level carries a 5% unit surcharge. This is limited to three levels, but research may increase the allowed levels by one per Development success. A unit may also be built with decreased mobility. Each such level carries with it a 5 point DEFENSE penalty in FOTS and a loss of one point of speed or thrust. The unit gets a 5% unit discount per level. This is limited to three levels, but each Development success can increase this by one level. The point of such research would be to create ever cheaper units with ever less mobility, which might be handy for (e.g.) units you never plan to see come under fire, or survive it anyway if they do. Tactical mobility describes movement in real space, not FTL movement. Baseline 2nd and 3rd Gen tactical mobility is 6 for all starships, 9 for gunboats, and 12 for fighters. Tactical mobility improves by +2 pts at each successive technological generation above 3rd and decreases for each successive technological generation below 2nd.

 

Improved/decreased tactical FTL mobility:  This is a baseline capability for any space-faring state, but it can be increased with additional research. A tactically mobile unit (ie, any unit capable of FTL flight) may be built with increased ability to drop out of FTL flight deeper into or farther out from a star systemís primary star. Baseline 2nd and 3rd Gen capability begins at 3 light hours (ie, 3 light hours from a primary star any baseline 2nd or 3rd Gen FTL-capable unit must drop out of FTL flight to sublight speed into real space). Each level of improved tactical FTL mobility allows the unit to drop out of FTL flight 1 light hour deeper into a system (ie, at 2 light hours from the primary star for the first level, at 1 hour for the 2nd level, and at 30 minutes for the third level). Each level carries a 5% unit surcharge. This is limited to three levels, but research may increase the allowed levels by one per Development success. A unit may also be built with decreased tactical FTL mobility. Each such level provides a 5% unit discount. This is limited to 3 levels, but each Development success can increase this by 1 level. Each level of decreased tactical FTL mobility at 2nd and 3rd Gen levels increases the point at which a unit must drop out of FTL flight by 1 light hour (ie to 4 light hours for the first level, to 5 light hours for the 2nd level, etc.). Tactical FTL mobility describes where in real space, in relation to the systemís primary star, a unit must drop out of FTL flight.

 

Improved fire control: Improved fire control provides weapons a target bonus in exchange for a large increase in cost. Weapons may receive up to a 20 point target bonus from improved fire control. The cost of the weapons is increased by triple the target bonus as a percentage. For example, weapons with the full 20 point bonus would cost 60% more than they would normally. Improved fire control is a baseline technology. Non-baseline technologies, such as battlecomputers, will provide similar bonuses at lower or no cost.

 

Increased firing arcs: This is a baseline capability for any space-faring state. The baseline firing arc for any normal, non-spinal-mount weapon is 60-degrees forward along a unitís line of travel. Each level of increased firing arc improves a unitís firing arc by +30-degrees to either side (ie, from 60-degrees forward to 120-degrees for the first level, 180-degrees for the second level, etc.) for double the cost of the weapon. Each level of improved firing arcs allows a TARGET 5 tag for that weapon system alone. For example, a 1-pt beam weapon (3.33 RPs standard) with the a full 360-degree arc (5 levels) of fire would have an additional 16.67 RPs (5*3.33) added to its cost for a total of 20 RPs cost. Spinal-mount weapons may not have their firing arcs increased (baseline firing arc for a spinal-mount weapon is through a line directly ahead of the ship (ie a single hex row in the direction the unit is facing); Exception: Continuous beam weapons allow a spinal-mount weapon to ďsweepĒ through an arc targeting multiple units and are a specific application of this technology (ie, CBW technology)). Missile launchers do not require improved firing arcs and may not benefit from them as the missiles are individually-targeted systems on their own. Missiles may possess their own improved targeting systems and advantages.

 

Intel academy: This facility costs 40 RPís and may train up to 20 graded spymasters per turn.

 

Laboratory Bays: Lab bays are specialized compartments assisting scientific research and development. The computer systems are specialized to handle large amounts of data being processed by up to several dozen scientists simultaneously. Laboratory bays function to increase the number of RPs spent on R&D by 1% each for the specific project to which they are assigned. Each laboratory bay is a size-1 system with a cost of 3.33 RPs.

 

Long-range Scanner: Also known as long-range sensors, LR scanners are devices that improve detection range and reduce survey time requirements (see Survey Rules). Each LR scanner is a size-1 system and costs 3.33 RPs.

 

Magazines: A magazine is a size-1 automated system used to increase the ammunition capacity of a unit's missile launchers or other ammunition based systems. Each magazine costs 3.33 RPs and increases the number of combat rounds of ammunition available to a starship's missile launchers by its base hull size. For example, a Hl 10 ship normally has 10 rounds of ammunition for its missile launchers, but adding a single magazine doubles this to 20 combat rounds worth of fire.

 

Maglocks: A maglink (or maglock) is a mechanical magnetic hookup for attaching something to a starship (such as a gunboat or cargo pod). Each maglink is a size-1 system with a cost of 3.33 RPs. A starship's maglink has a tow capacity of 5 hull pts (i.e. each maglink can have up to 5 hull pts of starship hull attached to it). Maglinks are most commonly found on tugs, and gunboat tenders. Maglinks can be "ganged" to handle larger capacities.

 

Medical centers: Medical Centers increase the base SRP output of a world that produces the SRP Drugs/-Medicinals by 10%. Medical Centers cost 400 RPs each. Medical Centers can only be constructed on previously colonized worlds.

 

Minefields: Minefields consist of hundreds or thousands of small or large mines that deploy beam or torpedo weapons that actively seek their targets. Mines are built and function as individual missiles. Each mine has a cost based on the total of its beam, shield, torpedo, and hull values beginning at 0.125 RPs for a 1-pt warhead mine. Essentially, mines are loiter-mode missiles. As such, they are vulnerable to point defense and so use a MIS/mis#### tag. Mines are expended as they are used. A typical 1-pt mine would be modeled in the BE as follows,

 

Mine,0,0,0,0,1,1,0,0,0,[1 mis0011 ammo 1] MINE

 

Minelayers: A minelayer is a size-1 system capable of storing, deploying, and retrieving mines. Each minelayer costs 3.33 RPs. Essentially, a minelayer is a missile launcher for mines.

 

Minesweepers: A unit built as a minesweeper has fire control systems optimized for the quick discovery and rapid elimination of hostile minefields. A minesweeper pays a 15% unit surcharge for the capability, and loses its first normal round of fire when using it in combat. Instead of normal fire, these weapons are assumed to be blasting away at mines, with exquisite selectivity, precision, and speed. One hostile mine packet is simply removed from the fleet file before it is entered into the BE per fire packet of minesweeping weaponry. For example, a minesweeper using 20 missile launchers and one main volley of 5 points of beam weaponry will sweep 21 mines prior to standard combat. The GM may select these randomly, perhaps with a single round of BE combat with nothing but those mines in the enemy fleet. Weapons used for minesweeping must be long range or standard range, since the minesweeping effect occurs just prior to normal fire. Minesweepers will be most effective when their fire is divided into many packets, even though this is not a strict technical requirement. Weapons with flak targeting may be counted as firing in flak mode for minesweeping purposes, even though there may be nothing with a FIGHTER tag in the enemy fleet file after minesweeping. Minesweepers are a baseline technology for 2nd gen states.

 

Mining Stations: Mining Stations increase the base RP output of a world by 10% reflecting massive strip-mining operations. Mining Stations cost 400 RPs each. Mining Stations may be positioned on any type or class of planet (exception: only Mining Stations belonging to gas giant natives may be placed on gas giants, at least initially) regardless of whether or not that planet has been colonized. It would require 10 Mining Stations to bring the output of a planet up to its maximum RP potential. An additional 10 Mining Stations could then be emplaced to double the planet's RP output; this additional use of mining stations constitutes strip-mining. Stripmining a planet will result in the production of twice the maximum output of RPs from the planet being stripmined. For example, a planet that produces 200 RPs per turn normally would produce 400 RPs per turn when strip-mined. Stripmining may be continued for a maximum of 6 turns. On the 7th turn, the production of the planet falls to 0 RPs per turn and the planet becomes devastated. Any mining stations or colonists that are not removed from the planet during the 7th turn are automatically destroyed at the start of the next turn, the one that would have been the 8th turn of mining. Mining Stations may not be used to enhance the output of the SRP Oil/Plastics, Food/Agricultural Products, Drugs/Medicinals, Fuel/-Energy Sources, or Antimatter.

 

Missiles: Missiles are expendable offensive weapon systems which carry warheads. Each missile is a 1-time use only system (i.e., a missile launcher fires 1 missile which cannot be re-used after it has been fired). Each missile is rated according to the number of damage points its warhead can cause to a target; a player might be able to build missiles which have 1, 2, or 3-pt warheads. Missiles are constructed by Missile Factories (a 40 RP facility). Each missile's cost is calculated as follows,

 

                0.125 RPs per 1-pt of warhead strength

 

Thus, a missile with a warhead yield of 3-pts would cost 0.125x3 =0.375 = 0.38 RPs each.

 

Damage specials such as MESON, VIBRO, DIS, or HEAT increase missile cost by 100% each.

 

Missile factories: These are facilities used in missile production. Each missile factory can produce 200 RPís of missile per turn as a 2nd gen baseline capability.

 

Missile Launchers: Missile launchers are offensive weapon systems which fire missiles. Each missile launcher is a size-1 system. Missile launchers are paid for according to the number of launchers carried, not by the rating of the warheads (which are paid for separately). Thus, a ship which carries 10 missile launchers firing missiles with 3-pt warheads would have a Tp rating of 10 which would have a cost of 10x3.33 =33.33 =33 RPs. Each missile launcher has a rate of fire of 1 missile per combat round per missile launcher. Starships carry a number of rounds of fire for each of their launchers equivalent to their hull size (e.g., a Hl 10 ship would carry 10 combat rounds of ammunition for its missile launchers). Ammunition capacity can be increased by adding a Magazine system to a starship.

 

Mobile bases: This is a baseline technology for starfaring nations. A mobile base is one built to be towed and put back into service rapidly thereafter. A mobile base pays a 15% unit surcharge for the capability. The base can be towed. After towing, it can be made ready for normal functioning in 2 weeks per turn of normal build time. For example, with 6 hull per turn build rate, a 12 hull mobile base would be ready to operate 4 weeks after release from towing.

 

Naval academies: These are facilities used for the training of graded officers for shipboard duty. Each academy costs 40 RP's and can produce 20 officers per turn.

 

Passenger liners: These are ships specifically designed to move private citizens about, for business or pleasure. A fleet of passenger liners can contribute to the simple happiness of a nation with the interstellar travel they encourage, and can serve to give people a more tangible sense of national unity. Passenger liners are built around liner quarters. Liner quarters occupy two equipment spaces each and cost 6.67 RPís base. In wartime, passenger liners may be pressed into military service; in this case, each liner quarters may serve as one barracks. In normal peacetime use, the number of liner quarters on passenger liners a nation operates determines whether or not the passenger liners provide an SR bonus. If a minimum of one liner quarters per 500 RPís of base RP production is operated by an empire, that empire gets a +5 SR bonus. The movements of the passenger liners are pretty much under GM control; they are unlikely to go through uncontrolled space or near war zones (although Kahs vacationers might positively like that sort of thing), and they normally will visit nearby nations with which you have trade agreements and decent (public) diplomatic relations. Movements of passenger liners can create opportunities for various covert operations, and the destruction of a passenger liner should be considered a serious diplomatic incident. Passenger liners may take advantage of dedicated transport architecture if it is a known technology.

 

Power Systems Tech: Each advance in PST makes for an increase in equipment spaces per hull size. The way to go up from 1st generation 1.5 equipment spaces per hull size to 2nd generation 2 equipment space per hull size is to advance up the Power Systems Tech branch. This represents the smaller space requirements of various power systems for the drive and for the other systems (shields, weapons, scanners) that come with power tech advance. Each Discovery-Research-Development effort in Power Systems Tech gets you an advance in your equipment space per hull size ratio of +.25. So,

 

0 Gen Power Systems Tech - 1.25 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

1st Gen PST - 1.5 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

Late 1st Gen PST - 1.75 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

2nd Gen PST - 2.0 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

Late 2nd Gen PST - 2.25 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

3rd Gen PST - 2.5 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

Late 3rd Gen PST - 2.75 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

4th Gen PST - 3.0 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

Late 4th Gen PST - 3.25 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

5th Gen PST - 3.5 equipment spaces per hull size (starship rate)

and so in principle on.

Gunboat rates for equipment spaces are as per starship rates times .75. Fighter rates for equipment spaces are as per starship rates times .5. Base rates for equipment spaces are as per starship rates times 1.5.

 

Power Systems Tech also establishes the maximum amount of energy-based systems a unit can effectively power. With 1st gen power systems, a unit may power beams, shields, and torpedoes with ratings up to 8 times its hull size. This increases by 2 per PST advance, or by 4 per whole generation, up to 4th gen PST. After that, power limits are at GM discretion.

 

Railguns: Railguns are weapons that function through the use of very high velocity shells that slam into a target and do damage through the release of kinetic energy, essentially like bullets. Each railgun takes one equipment space and costs 1 pt (3.33 RPs base). The damage done per railgun depends on the damage rating of its shells. Railgun shells are priced exactly as missiles are. The initial rating of railgun shells is 1 pt. A ship using railguns stores one complete round of fire per base Hl point; this may be increased through the use of magazines as for missiles.

 

Refineries: Refineries increase the base SRP or SSRP output of a world that produces Unrefined Fuels, Power Generation/-Focusing Crystals, Explosive Materials, Abrasive Materials, Lubricant Materials, Acids/Acidic Materials, Volatiles, Organics, Oil/Plastics Sources, Fuel/Energy Sources, or Gasses/Life Support Materials SRP's, or Special Gasses, Synthetic Materials Sources, Naturally Explosive Materials, Special Abrasive Materials, Special Lubricant Materials, Special Acidic Materials, Naturally Refined Fuel/Energy Sources, or certain Extraordinaries SSRP's, by 10%. Refineries cost 400 RPs. Refineries can only be constructed on previously colonized worlds.

 

Repair bays: Repair bays function in a similar manner to shipyard bays, but are specialized to handle the repair of battle damage to ships. They may not be used for starship construction except under extremely special circumstances (judged by the GM on a case-by-case basis). Each repair bay is a size-1 system with a cost of 3.33 RPs.

 

Reserve fleets: Reserve fleets are ones that are not kept fully available for duty all the time. These fleets are typically mothballed, with their crews serving off-ship or as reserve military personnel. Reserve fleets are not able to move or fight without one turn spent mobilizing when called to service. While they are not mobilized, reserve fleets do not count when determining the size of navies for SR purposes. Mobilization of reserve fleets outside of wartime may cause an additional SR penalty, as the populace normally expects reserve fleets to be reserved for that sort of emergency; reserve fleets arenít something intended for ďpolice actionsĒ, exploration, or simply showing the flag. Reserve fleets have no relation to RESERVE tags in the BE.

 

Reserve ground forces: Reserve ground forces are ones that are not kept fully available for military duty all the time. Reservists maintain military careers only part-time, at least outside wartime. Reserve ground forces are not available for transport off the planet to which they are assigned without one turn spent mobilizing when called to service. They are available for defending the planet, although the GM may rule that they arenít available in time in case of especially sudden attacks. While they are not mobilized, reserve ground forces do not count when determining the size of ground forces for SR purposes. Mobilization of reserve ground forces outside of wartime may cause an additional SR penalty, as the populace normally expects the reservists to be left to their peacetime lives barring that kind of national emergency. Reserve ground forces have no relation to RESERVE tags in the BE.

 

Shields: All shield systems are rated according to the amount of damage that they can "absorb" before flaring. Shields are electromagnetic systems that require projectors in order to function. Each shield projector is a size-1 system capable of absorbing a specific amount of damage. Shields are paid for "by rating" (e.g., a ship equipped with 10x1-pt shield projectors would have a shield rating of 10 pts which would cost 10/3=3.33x10=33 RPs). Shields of this type are "ablative" in nature. Resistant shields are discussed elsewhere.

 

Ships: Starships are the standard interstellar vehicle in FOTS. They are described in detail in rules section 6.2.0.

 

Shipyard Bays: Shipyard bays allow for the construction of starship, gunboat, and fighter hulls. Shipyard bays can be "ganged" to handle many different sizes of hulls (e.g., 10 shipyard bays could be ganged together to handle the construction of a single Hl 10 ship, 2 Hl 5 ships, 3 Hl 3 ships, 10 fighters, etc.). Each shipyard bay is a size-1 system with a cost of 3.33 RPs. Free-standing shipyard capacity may also be purchased independently or added to an existing independent shipyard or base, at 5 RPís and 1 hull point of build time per 1 hull additional capacity.

 

Simulator craft: Crew grade bonuses earned by crews of simulator craft can be carried over to other craft, to which the former crew of the simulator craft move at the end of training. As a result, ships can have the benefit of a shakedown cruise on their first turn in action, if the crew spent the turn(s) of construction training on simulator craft. A ship to be used as a simulator craft must have all but one or two equipment spaces occupied by military systems Ė including at least weapons, hangars, sensors, not including barracks or cargo bays. These systems neednít be the latest and most expensive systems, and many training vessels are likely to be built (or taken out of active service) with old-fashioned one point per space weapons after newer ones become available. A simulator craft provides trained crews for ships equal to their total hull ratings. Bases can also be used for simulator craft, but the otherwise unneeded systems for ship crew training force the base to take a 15% unit surcharge. However, given the larger crews bases have, every 2 hull of simulator-equipped base provides training for 5 hull points of ship. Whenever a crew is shipped off the simulator craft, the simulator craft is reset to Green crew grade itself.

 

Spy Networks: A Spy Network is an organization set up by a government for Specified covert operations of whatever type against a particular foreign state. Each turn the Spy Network generates Operation Points (OPís) equal to the amount of RPís invested in the Network to date for Specified operations against that target state. Spy Networks require a minimum 100 RP investment. Additional details on the use of Spy Networks are in rules section 17.0.0.

 

Strong Points: This is a ground-based base fitted with barracks and troops; also known as a fortification.

 

Structural reinforcements: Structural reinforcements are size-1 systems that cost 3.33 RPs each. They act to add 1-pt to a starship's hull rating, but do not increase hull size (e.g., a size-15 hull with 3 structural reinforcements would have a hull rating of 18 pts in combat and for armoring purposes, but would have remaining equipment spaces reduced by 3 pts as well). Structural reinforcements are also sometimes known as bulkheads, though this can be misleading, as the reinforcements do not normally consist of heavy steel doors.

 

Subassembly plants: A Subassembly Plant is a specialized facility for boosting a shipyard's building rate. Subassembly Plants are attached directly to shipyards and function by assembling subsystems and modules for bulk installation on starships. Each Subassembly Plant costs 200 RPs. A maximum of 1 Subassembly Plant can be attached to any base or shipyard. Subassembly Plants can be constructed according to the rules for heavy industrial facilities in 5.1.0.

 

Submersible wet naval units: This is a baseline technology for any FOTS state. Submersible wet naval units pay a 15% unit surcharge for the ability. They receive a first strike effect in ground combat, except during the initial attack to secure a planethead. In addition, a submersible unit not involved in the initial phases of defense of its world may remain undetected underwater until either (1) it attacks, (2) the colony has a standard garrison occupying it at the beginning of the turn, or (3) the colony is assimilated.

 

Survey bays: Survey bays are systems that optimize a shipís survey capabilities. They include dedicated survey data processors, facilities for landing teams, laboratories for analysis of atmospheric and soil samples, and other equipment for similar purposes. A survey bay costs 2 pts (6.67 RPs) and occupies either 2 spaces aboard a ship or 4 internal spaces aboard a gunboat. Survey information can be found in rules section 12.

 

Tractor beams: A tractor beam is a ranged magnetic "beam" that functions in a similar manner to maglinks, but without the actual mechanical connection. Tractor beams are size-1 systems with a cost of 3.33 RPs per 5 hull pts of capacity (e.g., a single tractor beam could be constructed to handle 15 hull pts, for example, for a cost of 3.33x3=9.99 (10) RPs - this tractor beam would still be a size-1 system).

 

Training camps: The facilities for building ground forces and space forces are called Training Camps. One Training Camp may train or house 1500 ground force personnel per hull point. Training Camps cost 120 RPs and have stats of 0,0,0,24. Training Camps also require time to build and are constructed as industrial facilities are. The homeworld of all players is considered to possess a single size-48 Training Camp on it. Training Camps may be constructed on planetary surfaces or in space.

 

Tug modifications: A tug is made a tug by getting special engine reinforcements for heavier loads. This takes a 25% surcharge on the tugís cost. A tug may also get additional reinforcements, for one equipment space and 3.33 RPís each. A tug is capable of towing a greater amount of hull points than a non-tug towing other units, and unlike non-tugs is capable of towing at maximum warp speed. Tug reinforcements increase towing capacity by 5 Hl each.

 

Very Long Range Sensor (VLRS): A VLRS provides ship detection and space monitoring capabilities out to the range of an empireís comm/scan range. The comm/scan network is defined by an empireís comm/scan range and the locations of its colonies and any units that deploy both a communications center and a VLRS. A VLRS costs 1 pt (3.33 RPs base) on a base and occupies one equipment space there. On a ship, a less suitable platform for extending the regular comm/scan network, a VLRS costs 5 pts (16.67 RPs base) and occupies 5 equipment spaces. Relevant rules sections for supply, communication, and ship detection rules include sections 4.4.1, 14.0.0, 14.4.0, and 14.5.0.

 

Warp Drive: The standard faster-than-light (FTL) drive system in FOTS. Warp drive functions by generating a bubble of warped space/time around the generating ship. This bubble allows the ship to slip through normal space at rates which, to an outside observer, appears to be several multiples of the speed of light, but which has no relativistic effects upon the crew or the way they view the rest of the universe. A similar system is used for realspace drives. In the FOTS system, FTL and realspace drives are already taken into consideration when determining hull sizes and equipment spaces available. Standard movement rates in the game are a cruiser speed of warp factor (WF) 5 and maximum of WF 7. These are 384 times and 1536 times the speed of light, respectively. Its use is described in rules section 4.0.0.

 

Weapon batteries: This is a 0 gen, baseline capability, the spacecraft descendent of the turret. Weapons in a battery constitute a fire packet distinct from all other fire packets of that unit, and use some combination of battery tags to reflect this. For example, a ship with 10 2 point beams might organize them into a standard 16 point volley, and 2 2 point batteries. Typically, this would mean weapon tags of [16][2][2], assuming no other tags for these weapons. The cost for putting weapons into a battery equals the cost of the weapons themselves. In the example above, the ship would pay 4 points - 2 batteries of 2 points of weapon rating each - for this battery arrangement.

 

Wet naval forces: These are planetary combat forces for use on water. They are not generally suitable for invasions Ė dropping an aircraft carrier from orbit is more of an expensive and eccentric form of orbital bombardment than planetary invasion Ė and receive a 25% cost break as a result. Wet naval units are described in additional detail in rules section 6.6.0.

 

Wet naval yards: Wet navy forces must be raised in a wet navy yard, which costs 5 RPís per ship Hl capacity. The build rate at wet naval yards is identical for that of space shipyards.

 

 

 

HOME     BACK     ABOUT     STORE     Appendix 2 - Additional Technology Definitions

 

 

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